Trent and Vatican II: Suggested Principles for Analysis

by Trevor Anderson I was born about twenty years after the Second Vatican Council, and came into communion with the Roman Catholic Church about twenty-five years after that, so I have no recollection of what the Catholic Church was like before Vatican II. Likewise, I have no recollection of what the relations between Protestants and Catholics,… Read More Trent and Vatican II: Suggested Principles for Analysis

Merit, Aquinas, and Calvin: Letting the Differences Abide

by Aaron Anderson Concluding his essay “Calvin’s Critique of Merit, and Why Aquinas (Mostly) Agrees,” Charles Raith writes: The vision of rapprochement between Catholic and Reformed theology presented here does not argue that the differences between Calvin and his opponents were in actuality minor issues of little consequence to the Christian faith and therefore should be dismissed… Read More Merit, Aquinas, and Calvin: Letting the Differences Abide

Chris Castaldo, cont’d: Further Resources

Dr. Chris Castaldo was recently interviewed on our site. Below are some more resources from Castaldo; all make for excellent viewing. At a moment when many Reformed traditions are reassessing the optimism of the modern ecumenical movements, and cautiously charting possibilities for a chastened dialogue with Roman Catholics, Castaldo stands out as a Reformed evangelical who is eminently… Read More Chris Castaldo, cont’d: Further Resources

Interview: Talking with Chris Castaldo about the Gospel

Dr. Chris Castaldo (Ph.D., London School of Theology) is the Senior Pastor at New Covenant Church, Naperville, IL. Dr. Castaldo has authored and contributed to several books on the Reformation including The Unfinished Reformation: What Unites and Divides Catholics and Protestants After 500 Years (Zondervan, 2016), Talking with Catholics about the Gospel: A Guide for… Read More Interview: Talking with Chris Castaldo about the Gospel

A Review of Matthew Levering’s Engaging the Doctrine of Revelation

(Baker Academic, 2014) by Aaron Anderson Among the accolades for Matthew Levering’s latest text on the doctrine of revelation is this from John Webster, one of Levering’s main Reformed interlocutors: “Engaging the Doctrine of Revelation possesses all the qualities that readers have come to expect from [Levering]: wide historical learning, theological discrimination, clarity of thought, and… Read More A Review of Matthew Levering’s Engaging the Doctrine of Revelation

Does Unity Matter? Luther on the Unity of the Church

by Eric J. DeMeuse In his now classic study of Martin Luther, Heiko Oberman writes that ‘Luther does not stand for the alternatives “truth not unity,” “conscience not institution,” “individual not community”.’ This sentence sums up, I think, Oberman’s project rather succinctly; namely, to overturn an old, ingrained ‘Here I stand’ narrative of radical discontinuity… Read More Does Unity Matter? Luther on the Unity of the Church

Protestantism, Liberal Learning, and Scholasticism: Part 2

by Matthew T. Gaetano In my previous post, I wanted to challenge the perspective of some (unnamed) Catholics who are wrongly suspicious of Protestant views of learning. The great writers of ancient Greece and Rome (such as Aristotle and Cicero) were appropriated by Reformed and Lutheran writers, just as they had been by medieval and Renaissance… Read More Protestantism, Liberal Learning, and Scholasticism: Part 2