Henri de Lubac’s Criticism of Indirect Power

by Matthew Gaetano In my previous post, I discussed theologians who offered interpretations of the doctrine of the two swords before the Second Vatican Council. While some hierocrats believed that the pope’s two swords made him lord of the world, Vitoria, Bellarmine, and Suarez argued that popes had indirect power in temporal matters. Papal power… Read More Henri de Lubac’s Criticism of Indirect Power

Boniface VIII’s Two Swords and the Theologians

by Matthew Gaetano In the excellent dialogue hosted at the Regensburg Forum several months ago about Vatican II, religious freedom, and political theology, Boniface VIII seems (quite understandably) to have been in the background. His 1308 bull Unam Sanctam makes several claims that remain important to contemporary theological discussion. Boniface speaks of two swords: the spiritual and the temporal. Both… Read More Boniface VIII’s Two Swords and the Theologians

The True, the Good, and the Beautiful in Reformed Scholasticism

by Matthew Gaetano This title is a bit misleading because I only intend to offer brief remarks about Bartholomew Keckermann’s statements about the transcendental properties of being in his Compendious System of the Science of Metaphysics (1611). I hope that it helps to develop the remarks about scholasticism and the Reformed tradition from previous posts. A Reformed… Read More The True, the Good, and the Beautiful in Reformed Scholasticism

Cocq vs. Hobbes on the Church and Ministry

by Matthew Gaetano Dutch Calvinist (discussed elsewhere at TRF) Gisbertus Cocq opposes Thomas Hobbes’s view of the Church and ministry in his Anatomy of Hobbesianism. In reply to Hobbes’s teaching that there are as many churches as there are Christian kingdoms or republics, Cocq says, “If there exist particular churches, there necessarily also exists a universal… Read More Cocq vs. Hobbes on the Church and Ministry

Political Theology, Modernity, and Late Scholasticism

by Matthew Gaetano I expect that political theology and “modernity criticism” (or, perhaps better, criticism of modernity criticism) will become important themes for The Regensburg Forum. As we will see, this is not a turn from our fundamental mission of encouraging scholarly conversation between Reformed, Roman Catholic, and Lutheran Christians in the Augustinian tradition. Some of these… Read More Political Theology, Modernity, and Late Scholasticism