Scholastic Developments on Merit: A Downward Path into Pelagianism?

by Charles Raith II “The Schools have always gone from worse to worse, until at length, in their downward path, they have degenerated into a kind of Pelagianism.”[1] This is John Calvin’s summary assessment of the theological trajectory of medieval scholastic theology, and nothing captured this downward descent into Pelagianism like the doctrine of merit.… Read More Scholastic Developments on Merit: A Downward Path into Pelagianism?

Justification after Trent – and the (largely forgotten) Augustinian Gianlorenzo Berti

by Matthew Gaetano A. N. S. Lane, a scholar whose work should be of great relevance to future conversation, states the following in his book on justification: The Tridentine Decree on Justification is one of the most impressive achievements of the council. The leaders of the council had reported to Rome that ‘the significance of the Council… Read More Justification after Trent – and the (largely forgotten) Augustinian Gianlorenzo Berti

Gisbertus Voetius and Reformed Catholicity

by Matthew Gaetano Gisbertus Voetius (1589-1676) was a major Dutch Reformed theologian whose works demonstrate mastery not only of Scripture, the Church Fathers, and medieval theology, but also a command of the works of contemporary Roman Catholic scholastic authors. He studied at Leiden, participated in the Synod of Dort, and then taught at Utrecht, where he confronted the… Read More Gisbertus Voetius and Reformed Catholicity

Merit, Aquinas, and Calvin: Letting the Differences Abide

by Aaron Anderson Concluding his essay “Calvin’s Critique of Merit, and Why Aquinas (Mostly) Agrees,” Charles Raith writes: The vision of rapprochement between Catholic and Reformed theology presented here does not argue that the differences between Calvin and his opponents were in actuality minor issues of little consequence to the Christian faith and therefore should be dismissed… Read More Merit, Aquinas, and Calvin: Letting the Differences Abide