The True, the Good, and the Beautiful in Reformed Scholasticism

by Matthew Gaetano This title is a bit misleading because I only intend to offer brief remarks about Bartholomew Keckermann’s statements about the transcendental properties of being in his Compendious System of the Science of Metaphysics (1611). I hope that it helps to develop the remarks about scholasticism and the Reformed tradition from previous posts. A Reformed… Read More The True, the Good, and the Beautiful in Reformed Scholasticism

Post-Tridentine Scholasticism and Tertullian

by Matthew Gaetano Tertullian is famous for asking: “What indeed has Athens to do with Jerusalem? What concord is there between the Academy and the Church?” He then declares: “Away with all attempts to produce a mottled Christianity of Stoic, Platonic, and dialectic composition! We want no curious disputation after possessing Christ Jesus, no inquisition… Read More Post-Tridentine Scholasticism and Tertullian

Voetius on Creation, Death, and Human Nature

by Matthew Gaetano The erudition of the Dutch Reformed theologian, Gisbertus Voetius, is often staggering. I’ve especially appreciated his disputations on creation because one can see his extensive knowledge not only of the whole Christian theological tradition but also his detailed grasp of the Greek, Arabic, and Latin philosophers. His views on creation, which take up… Read More Voetius on Creation, Death, and Human Nature

Merit, Aquinas, and Calvin: Letting the Differences Abide

by Aaron Anderson Concluding his essay “Calvin’s Critique of Merit, and Why Aquinas (Mostly) Agrees,” Charles Raith writes: The vision of rapprochement between Catholic and Reformed theology presented here does not argue that the differences between Calvin and his opponents were in actuality minor issues of little consequence to the Christian faith and therefore should be dismissed… Read More Merit, Aquinas, and Calvin: Letting the Differences Abide

Protestantism, Liberal Learning, and Scholasticism: Part 2

by Matthew T. Gaetano In my previous post, I wanted to challenge the perspective of some (unnamed) Catholics who are wrongly suspicious of Protestant views of learning. The great writers of ancient Greece and Rome (such as Aristotle and Cicero) were appropriated by Reformed and Lutheran writers, just as they had been by medieval and Renaissance… Read More Protestantism, Liberal Learning, and Scholasticism: Part 2

Protestantism, Liberal Learning, and Scholasticism: Part 1

by Matthew T. Gaetano In certain circles, I think that ecumenical dialogue may be hampered by mutual mischaracterizations related to liberal learning. Some Reformed thinkers criticize Roman Catholics for being excessively optimistic about human reason. Catholic thinkers, it is said, fail to recognize the damage done to human reason by original sin–in other words, the noetic… Read More Protestantism, Liberal Learning, and Scholasticism: Part 1