Scholastic Developments on Merit: A Downward Path into Pelagianism?

by Charles Raith II “The Schools have always gone from worse to worse, until at length, in their downward path, they have degenerated into a kind of Pelagianism.”[1] This is John Calvin’s summary assessment of the theological trajectory of medieval scholastic theology, and nothing captured this downward descent into Pelagianism like the doctrine of merit.… Read More Scholastic Developments on Merit: A Downward Path into Pelagianism?

Peter Martyr Vermigli and the Scholastic Inheritance: Potentia Absoluta and the Voice of Nature

by Joshua Benjamins In my last post, I highlighted the sharply divergent conceptions of the proper role of philosophy which emerge in the course of Peter Martyr Vermigli’s controversy with Johannes Brenz over the ubiquity of Christ’s glorified body. Another intriguing element of this particular debate is the way the two men appeal to divine… Read More Peter Martyr Vermigli and the Scholastic Inheritance: Potentia Absoluta and the Voice of Nature

Nature and Grace in Reformed Orthodoxy: Is there a Problem with the Narrative? (Or, on having your cake without the layers)

The Regensburg Forum is pleased to feature a series of posts by Jonathan Tomes, beginning with explorations in the development of nature and grace in Reformed Orthodox thought. Modern Reformed Protestants have not always been the most reliable on those points touching diversity in their tradition, though this historical myopia likely besets every tradition. Much… Read More Nature and Grace in Reformed Orthodoxy: Is there a Problem with the Narrative? (Or, on having your cake without the layers)

Peter Martyr Vermigli and the Scholastic Inheritance: The Proper Place of Philosophy

[Go here for part I in this series] by Joshua Benjamins In my last post, I explored one particular dimension of Peter Martyr Vermigli’s relationship with the scholastics by focusing on his use of scholastic sources in his debate with the Lutheran theologian, Johannes Brenz, over the hypostatic union of two natures in Christ and… Read More Peter Martyr Vermigli and the Scholastic Inheritance: The Proper Place of Philosophy

Peter Martyr Vermigli and the Scholastic Inheritance: Negotiating Scholastic Sources

[This is part 1 in a series] by Joshua Benjamins The sixteenth-century Reformers maintained a rather uneasy relationship to the scholastic theologians of the Middle Ages. While the early architects of what later became known as “Reformed scholasticism” adopted much of the methodology, terminology, and theological presuppositions of the medieval Schoolmen, their appropriation of the… Read More Peter Martyr Vermigli and the Scholastic Inheritance: Negotiating Scholastic Sources

Post-Tridentine Scholasticism and Tertullian

by Matthew Gaetano Tertullian is famous for asking: “What indeed has Athens to do with Jerusalem? What concord is there between the Academy and the Church?” He then declares: “Away with all attempts to produce a mottled Christianity of Stoic, Platonic, and dialectic composition! We want no curious disputation after possessing Christ Jesus, no inquisition… Read More Post-Tridentine Scholasticism and Tertullian